breeding clowns

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Postby sharkdude » 2007-02-08 14:44

ok I have persuaded the perants to let me have a marine tank...and I want to breed clowns
so a few Q's

1) do i need a filter and or skimmer with live rock?

2) what exactly is live sand?

3) i have read up on anenomies(sp?) and I should wait about a year for my water to mature. Do I need one to breed clowns?

4) Will the tank need to be much bigger than 25 G?

5)do I need any clean up crew like snails?

aand for now thats all i can think of
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Postby Perfectblue » 2007-02-08 22:09

sharkdude wrote:ok I have persuaded the perants to let me have a marine tank...and I want to breed clowns
so a few Q's


Breeding Clownfish is very difficult to do. You need to set up a couple tanks, one for the parents and one for the fry. Feeding the newly hatched Clownfish is difficult as you need to prepare your own live foods. I have not personally bred Clownfish so I can only offer you information that I've read. Breeding Clownfish is definitely not for someone just starting out so if this is your first marine tank I would personally set up a nice display with a variety of small fish. Once you gain more experience with marine tanks than you could attempt the breed Clownfishs.


sharkdude wrote:1) do i need a filter and or skimmer with live rock?


From what I've read live rock as well as a protein skimmer can be used on the tank housing the mated pair. However the tank which houses the fry only needs a sponge filter or similar one that does not pose a threat to the fry. An airstone and heater should also be placed in the fry rearing tank. You should provide enough water movement to slowly circulate the water and keep the fry moving.


sharkdude wrote:2) what exactly is live sand?


Live sand is collected from the ocean. There is bacteria as well as tiny organisms in the sand. Live sand is a good biological filtration base and the tiny organisms help consume excess detritus(leftover food, waste, etc.). Using reqular sand is fine as overtime the live rock will seed the sand making it "live".

sharkdude wrote:3) i have read up on anenomies(sp?) and I should wait about a year for my water to mature. Do I need one to breed clowns?


To breed Clownfish you do not need anything for them to host in. Although having something for them to host in will make them feel more secure and a better chance at successful spawn. They will host in Anemones as well as coral. When choosing which Anemone to use it depends on the species of Clownfish you are trying to breed. Yes waiting for the tank to become more established usually at least 6 months is best before introducing the Anemone.

The eggs are usually deposited next to the host on a smooth surface. The Parents will lay their eggs on live rock, clay pots, or even ceramic tile.

sharkdude wrote:4) Will the tank need to be much bigger than 25 G?


Again it depends on the species of Clownfish. For the tank housing the mated pair I would go with a tank between 20-30 gallons however this tank would only be suitable for a smaller species. The fry rearing tank should be between 10-20 gallons and a circular tank is preferred.


sharkdude wrote:5)do I need any clean up crew like snails?


In the tank with the mated pair I would have a normal amount of inverts for cleaning. A variety of snails is best, Nassarius, Astraea, Cerith, etc will all do fine. For the fry rearing tank I'm not sure on whether or not a cleanup crew would be a good idea as they may to harm to the eggs.

Other Things That You Should Know:

- The Clownfish pair should be fed a variety of seafood and veggies. All of these foods should be high quality and fresh.

- If your intent is to only breed the Clownfish then they should be the only fish in the tank. This will help them feel more secure.

- Special lighting is not required although a day/night cycle is so keep your tank lights on a timer.

Well that is all the information I can give you. Hope it helps you out some. :)
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Postby sharkdude » 2007-02-09 08:59

thanks mate!

I admit it is my first marine tank but i do not like to keep community/non breeding tanks and you are the first person to name them as difficult to breed, this may be due to the genral speaking that marine fish are hardly ever breed in home aq and the fact the can makes them 'easy'
I have read many places that they are peranting fish, so they can be bred and raised in the same tank as the perants?
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Postby atnixon » 2007-02-09 09:36

Dont know if these articles will help at all, but here ya go anyways...

<a href='http://reefmaniacs.com/hl/page10.html' target='_blank'>http://reefmaniacs.com/hl/page10.html</a>

<a href='http://www.tropicalfishdata.com/marine/clownfish/breeding_clownfish.html' target='_blank'>http://www.tropicalfishdata.com/marine/clo..._clownfish.html</a>

<a href='http://www.tinkerfish.com/aquarium/2005/08/breeding_clownf.html' target='_blank'>http://www.tinkerfish.com/aquarium/2005/08...ing_clownf.html</a>

Have to admit that o have not come across anybody who has successfully bred clowns in captivity. Obviously there are, but not really documented..

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Postby sharkdude » 2007-02-09 13:04

ta mate I'll check em out now
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Postby Kev » 2007-02-09 14:18

Also, I think I read somewhere that the lunar cycle has something to do with breeding too... hence why PB mentioned the day/night cycle.
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Postby Perfectblue » 2007-02-09 19:48

sharkdude wrote:t

I admit it is my first marine tank but i do not like to keep community/non breeding tanks and you are the first person to name them as difficult to breed, this may be due to the genral speaking that marine fish are hardly ever breed in home aq and the fact the can makes them 'easy'
I have read many places that they are peranting fish, so they can be bred and raised in the same tank as the perants?


When someone is setting up their first marine tank they should keep inhabitants that are easy to care for. Yes Clownfish are fairly easy fish to care for however trying to breed them is not. I understand that you don't want to set up a community tank although that would be the best option for your first tank in my opinion.

Hmm from the articles that I've read as well as hearing from people who bred Clownfish it is difficult. You need a good understanding of marine aquariums as well as the equipment and time to have success with breeding them. Culturing your own food, daily parameter tests, frequent water changes, detritus removal, etc. are some things that need to be done. Once the fry get older and reach a certain size the original rearing tank will not be able to handle that many fish. In terms of aggression as well as bioload. Water volume is important in marine aquariums not only because each fish should have it's own territory which reduces aggression but to dillute the waste. This is probably very important with raising fry as there will be many fish in one to two tanks. That is why possibly having the parents tank, fry rearing tanks, and seperate refugium plumbed together might be the best setup. You will get the added water volume from the other tanks as well as the filtration from the refugium.

As I stated before I have not personally bred Clownfish so you might be able to leave the fry in with the parents. From what I've read it has stated to remove the eggs or wait and remove the fry into a seperate tank. It would be preferred to feed the fry in their own tank to insure that they get enough to eat. You keep the fry rearing tank bare bottom which will make it very easy to clean up waste, leftover food, etc. The parents might possibly eat the eggs or fry which is another reason to move them.

I'm not sure if you mentioned this but what species did you have in mind? Larger species such as Maroon and Tomato Clownfish would be a much larger tank(40g+). Ocellaris or Percula Clownfish would be a good one to start breeding with. They are peaceful, easier to pair, and can be kept in a smaller tank(20g-25g).

I personally would like to start possibly breeding Clownfish in the future. However right now I don't have the time to dedicate to raising the fry.

If you have any more questions just ask. :)
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Postby sharkdude » 2007-02-09 20:19

I havn't found much information on idividual species, most articles state that smaller one are easier to keep.

I do not mind if the eggs are eaten too much, but as long as i am attemting to maintain the natural seas.

a Q on water, do i need RO water, i do not have the money to use an RO filter(or uy from an LFS) can i use rainwater?
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Postby Perfectblue » 2007-02-09 20:39

Using RO or RO/DI water is preferred because it removes impurities such as chlorine, phosphates, heavy metals, etc. I usually purchase my RO/DI water from a local fish store or sometimes even a grocery store. However if this water is not available to you then using dechlorinated tap water is fine.
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Postby sharkdude » 2007-02-10 14:35

after looking past the inital seting up cost i don't think I have anough money to run it. so I'm sticking to freshwater for now.

Also i'm prone to power cuts and marines are alot more sensative :S
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Postby man-alive » 2007-04-27 17:59

I would suggest setting up a regular display tank, corals and all (if you want), and purchasing a pair of clownfish, see if they will lay eggs on their own, if they do, when the fry apear they probably go straight to the coral and hide, if they don't lay eggs on their own you might have to set up a breading tank.
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Postby man-alive » 2007-04-27 18:02

Perfectblue wrote: Using RO or RO/DI water is preferred because it removes impurities such as chlorine, phosphates, heavy metals, etc. I usually purchase my RO/DI water from a local fish store or sometimes even a grocery store. However if this water is not available to you then using dechlorinated tap water is fine.

This is true about the RO filter, but different stuff can be purchased to take chemicals out, dechlorinators and such.
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Re: breeding clowns

Postby daisyeden » 2016-05-04 12:36

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Re: breeding clowns

Postby adleyami » 2016-06-04 12:39

They should.be good to.go when their about 4 months old.or so or when you get them eating just regular fish food I think but I'm not a breeder good luck

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Re: breeding clowns

Postby ramyakrishnan » 2017-07-17 18:08

Can you suggest me what type of environment should be set up for clownfish, i decided to by two pair.. can you guys suggest?

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